Don’t call me dude: The misgendering of non-binary people

I have an acquaintance who shares one of my biggest passions and we occasionally collaborate. We have been helpful to one another’s causes over the past year and have a productive back and forth. One problem: he calls me “dude” a lot. Even in texts.

This is me:

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I know. I ooze masculinity.

But I still get “dude-ed” by people regularly and I have a few theories about why:

One: They misinterpret my manner in conversation as being flirtatious when I don’t mean it to be (or want it to be), so (if not interested) they misgender me to send the message that they don’t see me as a sexual option. This the likely situation with my collaborator.

I don’t have a lot of nuance in my social presentation. When I’m trying to be nice to a man OR woman I know it can come across as a little too friendly and flirty, and this has led to sitcom-like misunderstandings in the past. As I’ve said in other posts, have two modes: Golden Retriever who’s been cooped up all day and Daria. Not a lot in between those until I get comfortable with someone.

Two: I’m not gender binary in that I don’t have super-femme way of speaking or moving or what I think of as an “affected” vocal style. When people hear me speak I don’t sound like a girly-girl or even a grown woman. No vocal fry or genteelness in me. My voice is gender neutral, but when people with binary expectations hear me they read it as masculine. The speech patterns of women in our culture (and others) is not inborn – it is a learned affectation.

For instance, my sister speaks to me in her “real” voice which is pitched lower like mine is, but when she is in certain social situations she, perhaps unconsciously, pitches her voice higher and starts to sound a bit like a Valley Girl. (Love u, sis.) This is a concession to conformity I am neither willing or able to make.  Another example is the way Japanese women are expected to pitch their voices very high or they face social censure.

But it doesn’t mean I’m gay and it definitely doesn’t mean I’m a dude or that I specifically identify as one. I’m a middle-aged cis-gendered heterosexual female. And a pretty one.

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Like, totally.

I’m happy with myself. However, I know many women and men on and off the spectrum who are much more non-binary in presentation than I am. I mean, just look at Temple Grandin. She’s never spoken about her sexuality or gender identity and that’s a shame because being non-binary is very common among autistic people. I can’t speak for everyone similar to me, but I think it has to do with not “seeing” OR respecting the arbitrary gender expectations that people with better social intelligence are ridiculously obsessed with. We find it unfairly constrictive and difficult to keep up a false self at all times.

We are purely ourselves and that should be respected.

[Additionally, there is a distinct overlap between trans people and ASD – being one makes you more likely to be the other. More research needs to be done to determine why – but who really cares why? Just stop being shitty to them, because they shouldn’t have to exhaust themselves to make normals comfortable anyway. They have the highest suicide rate of any group of people.]

The last reason people call me “dude” is the saddest and probably the most likely: Women and girls (the white ones anyway) don’t allow me into their circles for very long. I have a lot of problems with NT women in particular. Therefore, unlike most little girls and teens, I never learned the “proper” gender mannerisms and speech patterns and social skills of women because I was never around them. I couldn’t model my behavior on theirs. Instead, like many women with Asperger’s, I spent all my time hanging out with dudes. (This presents its own set of issues).

In my late teens/early twenties I started hanging out with hippy motherfuckers and they pretty much call everyone dude – sometimes in the middle of sex I’m sorry to report. I mirrored their speech patterns and mannerisms so I have a dude-like way of speaking at times and this throws people off.

I hope in the future our culture can be less condescending to those who eschew some of humanity’s sillier requirements for acceptance.

Until then, the dude abides.

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